Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Wednesday Vignette: Seeing the garden through a new lens

This is something of a continuation of last week's Wednesday Vignette, which compared a garden scene shot using my old camera with photos taken using the camera I received for my birthday.  In fits and starts, I'm slowly learning more about what my new camera can do that my old camera cannot.  I can't claim that I've instantly become a better photographer but the camera, or perhaps just the practice of experimenting with it, has provided a different view on my garden.  For today's Wednesday Vignette, I'm sharing a random collection of photos taken through the new lens.

An Aeonium arboreum cutting I stuck in the backyard border last year as filler material has been overtaken by Acacia cognata 'Cousin Itt'.  Having branched out and developed a nice red tint, the Aeonium still manages to stand out nicely.

Every time I see it, I'd swear that this Aeonium nobile is looking right at me.  It alternately makes me think of an alien creature or the CBS eye, which I learned had its origin in hex symbols of the human eye used by the Shakers to ward off evil spirits.  (I haven't been visited by raccoons recently, so maybe the hex works.)

I've shared photos of the Agave 'Blue Glow' before but the plants surrounding it, some added in the past year, have given it a different look. Planted behind the agave is Metrosideros collinia 'Springfire', acquired earlier this year.  To the left of the agave is Hymenolepsis parviflora, planted a year ago, and an English lavender that returned from the dead.  Cuttings of Euphorbia 'Sticks on Fire' and Kalanchoe add a touch of coral.

I've always had a hard time capturing decent photos of Globularia x indubia.  This one turned out rather well - and I got a bee too.

And I think this is the very first decent photo I've managed to get of the dime-sized flower buried within the sprawling foliage of Leptospermum 'Copper Glow'


For more Wednesday Vignettes, visit our host, Anna of Flutter & Hum.



All material © 2012-2017 by Kris Peterson for Late to the Garden Party

26 comments:

  1. You have definitely upped your photo-taking with this new camera! These are all great shots, but I especially like the Aeonium eye.

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    1. The camera's still doing most of the work at this point, Alison.

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  2. Great shots and I love the first one which looks like some sort of community of sea creatures in the tidal pool of 'Cousin Itt.'

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    1. An undersea theme was my target for that area, Peter, so I'm glad that you saw the photo from that vantage point. Of course, the way it's going, the Acacia eventually may just swamp everything in its path.

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  3. I like the photo showing the composition of agaves and others. It's very sculptural.

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    1. You can't beat succulents for creating that sculptural look, Lula. Thanks for visiting and commenting!

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  4. More outstanding buds -- those sweet, tiny striped ones on the Leptospermum. Great shots!

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    1. That Leptospermum doesn't produce many flowers (or at least it hasn't yet) but they are precious.

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  5. Nice shots from the new click! I love the Aeoniums, and the Blue Agave with the coral 'Sticks' is super!

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    1. 'Sticks on Fire' is another of the plants which I can easily cut and just poke in the ground without ceremony. It does take them a while to bulk up, though.

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  6. Good vignettes! The Aeoniums emerging from the shaggy curtain of 'Itt' are perfect.

    I saw the Leptospermum for sale--how do you like it? How big is it for you? Can't resist dark foliage.

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    1. I love that Leptospermum. It has a very loose, open habit. Mine have been in the front garden since December 2014 and, without actually getting out a tape measure, I'd guess the largest of the 2 is at least 6 feet tall and nearly as wide. I've trimmed them but lightly.

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  7. As a hold out of the point-and-shoot variety, I am enjoying your tip-toeing into the new camera realm. I fear if I shelled it the dough for a fancy pants camera I wouldn't have the tenacity to actually learn how to use it.

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    1. I doubt I'll ever turn myself into a real photographer, Loree. I don't currently have that depth of interest in the medium but, if with some nominal work, I can improve the photos I take routinely I'm up for that. The point-and-click camera is still easier to carry about and I intend to bring it and not the other to the Fling. Using only auto settings, the point-and-click works much better for my IaVoM photos but the SLR takes better close-ups in the garden.

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  8. New toy with beautiful subjects!! Enjoy!

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    1. I'm still early in the learning curve but having a new toy is always fun!

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  9. Wow Kris - this new camera will give your photography a whole new dimension! Love all your vignettes - although I think my favorite is the first one. The contrast is so striking...

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    1. I was very pleased with that photo too, Anna, although I'm not exactly sure why those Aeoniums are showing that much red - their color is deeper than others of the same species in the area.

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  10. Oh I see what you mean about the aeonium nobile Kris- it had the same effect on me and that's looking at it on a computer screen :) How spooky!

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    1. If the Aeonium hex keeps the raccoons away, I'm willing to live with spooky, Anna!

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  11. the detail on the tea tree is very rewarding.

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    1. It is! I'd been very frustrated trying to get a photo of the flowers with my point-and-click camera.

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